This is Part II of a larger series on E-bikes. If you want to read part I, click here. 

Most E-bikes run on one or more lithium ion batteries (Li-ion). They're typically found attached to a rear rack, the down tube, or the seat tube of the frame, and they can explode if not treated well.

This article is about how Li-ion batteries work, how they should be treated, and why they sometimes explode – and if there's a better option for e-bikes. I don't cover everything there is to know about e-bike batteries here because, well, I don't have the energy. You can find a more in-depth guide at https://batteryuniversity.com/

Here's the basic anatomy of a Li-ion battery: You got a positively charged cathode on one side, a negatively charged anode on the other side, and a separator in the middle.

For a few years I worked for a company that owned a stake in a clothing factory in China that specialized in athletic gear.

They weren't the best manufacturer, they made a good product and the stitching and quality assurance was always excellent, but the base materials were... mediocre. (please note, none of this was the factory's fault, nor my employer's, for reasons I'll get into.)

To explain, let's look at Gore-Tex.

I first raced a bicycle when I was eleven, and now I'm in my 30's. I've played the upgrade game, and under the auspice of "professional bicycle mechanic," I've been an NPC in the bicycle upgrade and entertainment industry. All that is to say that I know what upgrades matter, and which are hype.

This is my quick, no-bullshit guide to improving bike performance without, you know, actually training. 

This guide assumes you have a bike that fits and is appropriate for the type of riding you do.
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The printed size on a tire's label is rarely accurate, especially with Continental brand road tires, and double-especially if you stretch them over wide rims. As evidence I submit my new "28mm" Continental 4-Seasons tires, whose actual width measure out to be 31mm on my TK-540 hoops. Man, these dudes fill up like a latex zeppelin.

So, when I ride and hit bumps I can sometimes hear the tire rub on the underside of the fork crown and brake caliper.
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This piece can be found on its original home: Miracle Monocle, from the University of Louisville.

I've posted a rough draft of this essay on here before, but this is the final version. Goes well with the Christmas season, I think.

So do don't want to work that hard to ride a bike, but you also don't want a steam bike:

Nothing can please you! Maybe you should try an electricity-enhanced bicycle. This here is part one of a guide about some things you should know before getting into e-bikes.

Please note, this isn't an infomercial for Red Wings. I wrote this article because I couldn't find one like it while boot shopping last year. I wasted a lot of time trying to find the perfect boot for cycling and casual use, but hopefully y'all can avoid that.

What do you do when it's winter but you still want to ride your bike but you also don't want to ride it on the road like a normal person but you also don't want to get a mountain bike but you definitely want a completely different bike than anything else in your garage, the more niche the better?

Get you a Monster Cross bike!

The rules of what constitutes a monstercross bike are pretty loose. I don't even know if I'm supposed to spell it as one word or two.

One of the big things holding high-end cyclists back from buying a thru-axle bike in a big city is the lack of security options. Traditional 15mm nut and quick release wheels have Pinhead, Hublox, and a half dozen other designs to keep your wheels on your bike without connecting to an external lock, but for thru-axle riders there's really only one design on the market, and it's expensive.

UNTIL NOW!

This is a guide for a cheap way to secure your thru-axle wheels.
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Going into the 2006 Tour de France, Floyd Landis had been a favorite to win, but chronic pain forced him out of the lead. This was, in his mind, the last tour the thirty-one-year-old would ever have a chance at, knowing that after three unsuccessful surgeries he’d soon need to have his hip replaced. He broke it in a crash years earlier while working as a domestique for Lance Armstrong.
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